Specific Course Curriculum

Career and Life Management
English
French
Math
Phys Ed
Social Studies
Science
Outdoor Education
Business Education
Foods
Info Processing

 

Career and Life Management

CALM 20 is a mandatory course for the high school diploma and includes three themes which address the needs of students now and in the future. Recommended for Grade 11 students.

Careers and the World of Work:
Students investigate their personal interests, skills and values, careers, funding and entrance requirements for post-secondary education and the work environment.

Relationships:
This section is taught in three parts, each emphasizing the needs of students at the present time and after they leave home. Modules include: Well Being, Relating With Others and Human Sexuality.

Independent Living:
To prepare students for future financial decisions, this section includes the concepts of net worth, budgeting, banking, investing, credit (including mortgages), insurance, renting and income tax.

For further information go to http://www.learnalberta.ca/content/mychildslearning/highschool_calm.html

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English

In English Language Arts courses, students demonstrate increasing competence in the use of language and the appreciation and understanding of literature. The skills and concepts developed at each grade include reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing and representing. The course sequences have been developed to meet the needs, attitudes, interest and future plans of the students. Although movement between course sequences is possible, depending on the student’s achievement, it is important to note that each has a different focus and expectations. The student’s initial placement will be based on Grade 9 achievement.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 10-1
5 credits

Prerequisite: 65% in Grade 9 Language Arts is recommended
There are both literary and language components in this course. Students study and analyze fiction, non-fiction, poetry, drama, and feature film. Students will be required to produce personal and critical text (both print and non print) as they increase their ability to use language effectively. Students will use and develop technology skills for presenting and managing information.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 10-2
5 credits

Recommended for students with a mark of less than 65% in Language Arts 9
This course attempts to remedy and develop fundamental reading, writing, listening, speaking and viewing skills. The emphasis is on clear communication. English 10-2 is intended for students who, in junior high school, have found language arts challenging.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 20-1
5 credits

Prerequisite: English Language Arts 10-1
Students continue to develop skills in all language arts strands with increased emphasis on the essay as a vehicle for communication. They will improve their understanding of more sophisticated techniques of writing and expression and enhance their critical thinking skills. The use of information technology will be an integral part of this course.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 20-2
5 credits

Prerequisite: 50% in English Language Arts 10-2
This course emphasizes the development of effective communication skills and a critical attitude. Students will build confidence as they develop their English Language Arts skills for school success, future careers, and life goals.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 30-1
5 credits

Prerequisite: English 20-1 recommended
This course is a prerequisite for all university programs. In this course, students will focus on reflective analysis and critical evaluation of all literary forms, with extensive reading of various genres. The ability to use the literary essay as a means of expression will be practiced and perfected. Completion of this course requires the successful writing of the provincial diploma examination.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 30-2
5 credits

Prerequisite: 50% English 20-2
In this course, language and literature are studied in an integrated structure to refine skills in the six communication strands. Life skills such as job interviews, application, and report writing are stressed. Completion of this course requires the successful writing of the provincial diploma examination.

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French

A background in French can open doors to many foreign countries. In addition, career choices, opportunities, promotions and job security are all augmented when you speak another language.

A 30-level second language can be used as an entrance requirement for many faculties at most universities. At the University of Alberta, if you are entering the Faculty of Arts, you must present a second language or Math 30 Pure. One full course equivalent in a language other than English must also be completed as a graduation requirement. In other words, you may not need a second language to enter the Faculty of Arts, but you do need it to exit! Taking a second language in high school will save time (and money!) at university. Many other Canadian and American universities still require a second language, as do most graduate degree programs.

FRENCH 10-
5 credits

This is NOT a beginner’s course. It is designed for those students needing to strengthen their basic skills in French and for those who did not complete the full junior high program. It is, however, an intensive course in which all of the concepts (and more!) that are taught in French 7, 8, and 9 are again taught in French 10. Through individual and group projects, written exercises), French 10 provides the practice needed to progress to French 20.

FRENCH 20-
5 credits

Prerequisite: French 10 or Grade 7, 8 & 9 French This is a review and continuation of the junior high French program. Communication is stressed through both group and individual projects. An average of 60% in grade 9 French is strongly recommended. Those with less than 60% in grade 9 should register in French 10 so that they get their skills to an appropriate level.

FRENCH 30-
5 credits

Prerequisite: French 20 or equivalent (60% average in French 20 is recommended) This course involves further practice in listening, reading, writing and speaking French. There is an increased emphasis on the use of the French language within the classroom whenever possible. Daily communication activities occur in the classroom so students may attain an intermediate level of proficiency in the language.

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Math

Mathematic education prepares students to use mathematics to solve problems, to communicate and reason mathematically, to appreciate and value mathematics, to commit themselves to lifelong learning, and to become mathematically literate adults who use mathematics to contribute to society. Critical components of the math program include communication, connecting mathematical ideas to everyday experiences, estimation and mental math, problem solving, reasoning, technology, and visualization.

APPLIED MATHEMATICS 10-20-30 AND 
PURE MATHEMATICS 10-20-30-
5 credits each

These courses are based on two parallel program sequences, one in Applied Mathematics and one in Pure Mathematics, with some material common to both sequences.

In Applied Mathematics 10-20-30, emphasis is placed on applications of mathematics rather than on precise mathematical theory. The approaches used are primarily numerical and geometrical; algebraic and graphical methods are used when the contexts require them.

In Pure Mathematics 10-20-30, emphasis is placed on mathematical theory. The approaches used are primarily algebraic and graphical; computational methods are used when the contexts require them. Both of these streams continue to build on previous knowledge so it is important that students be diligent in their studies.

MATHEMATICS 14-
5 credits

This sequence is designed for students whose needs, interests and abilities focus on basic mathematical understanding. The emphasis is on the acquisition of practical life skills, and students are provided with opportunities to improve their skills in working with mathematics.

The mathematics outcomes for Math 14 are: problem solving; numeration; geometry; measurement; ratio and proportion; statistics and probability; algebra and graphing.

APPLIED MATHEMATICS 10

Topics studied include: spreadsheets for number tables and patterns; line segments and straight-line graphs; scales, triangles and statistical surveys; data tables and trends; imperial and metric measurement.

PURE MATHEMATICS 10

Topics studied include: spreadsheets for number tables and patterns; line segments and straight line graphs; scales, triangles and statistical surveys; operations on exponents, polynomials and rational expressions; irrational numbers and growth patterns.

MATHEMATICS 24

Prerequisite: 50% in Math 14
This sequence is designed for students whose needs, interests and abilities focus on basic mathematical understanding. The emphasis is on the acquisition of practical life skills, and students are provided with opportunities to improve their skills in working with mathematics. Students in Mathematics 24 apply mathematics in the contexts of: work; banking; transportation; accommodation; cost of independence.

APPLIED MATHEMATICS 20

Prerequisite: 50% in Applied Math 10 or 50% in Pure Math 10
Students in Applied Mathematics study: financial and consumer mathematics; quadratic functions; geometry of the circle; design and layout; data presentation and inference; inequalities and linear programming.

PURE MATHEMATICS 20

Prerequisite: 50% in Pure Math 10
Students in Pure Mathematics 20 study: financial and consumer mathematics; quadratic functions; geometry of the circle; solutions to nonlinear equations and linear systems; operations on functions, including polynomial functions; mathematical reasoning and proof.

APPLIED MATHEMATICS 30

Prerequisite: 50% in Applied Math 20 or 50% in Pure Math 20
Students in Applied Mathematics 30 study: statistics of the normal curve; vectors and matrices; sinusoidal models; financial analysis; process design and costing. Completion of this course requires the successful writing of the provincial diploma exam.

PURE MATHEMATICS 30

Prerequisite: 50% in Pure Math 20
Students in Pure Mathematics 30 study: statistics of the normal curve; algebraic transformations permutations, combinations and probability; circular functions; exponential and logarithmic functions; conic sections. Completion of this course requires the successful writing of the provincial diploma exam.

MATHEMATICS 31

This is a highly advanced course designed for students entering post-secondary programs that recommend or stipulate it as an entrance requirement. It is desirable that students complete Pure Mathematics 30 before taking Mathematics 31. In some circumstances, students may take Pure Mathematics 30 and Mathematics 31 in the same semester. The Mathematics 31 curriculum is comprised of the following required components and their related outcomes: pre-calculus and limits; derivatives and derivative theorems; applications of derivatives; integrals, integral theorems and integral applications.

At least one of the following elective components is included in the Mathematics 31 curriculum: calculus of exponential and logarithmic functions; numerical methods; volumes of revolution; applications of calculus to physical sciences and engineering; applications of calculus to biological sciences; applications of calculus to business and economics calculus theorems; further methods of integration.

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Phys Ed

Positive attitudes with dedication and commitment to physical education are the cornerstones for our students to achieve ultimate success.

General Outcomes

  • Acquire skills through a variety of developmentally appropriate movement activities.
  • Understand, experience and appreciate the health benefits that result from physical activity.
  • Interact positively with others.
  • Assume personal responsibility to lead an active way of life.

Activities

Students will achieve the aforementioned General Outcomes through a variety of physical activities. Students will have the opportunity for participation in the following dimensions:

  • Dance
  • Games
  • Types of gymnastics
  • Individual Activities
  • Activities in an alternative environment (aquatics, outdoor pursuits)

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 10-
3 credits

This course emphasizes active living that is valued and integrated into daily life. Activities may include: aquatics, badminton, basketball, biking / in-line skating, bowling, curling, fitness, dance, flag football, golf, lacrosse, touch rugby, stuntnastics, ultimate frisbee, and volleyball. A CPR unit focusing on risk, recognition, reaction, and resuscitation (how to help a choking victim and how to do CPR). Emphasis is placed on participation, cooperation, individual initiative (effort) and skill development.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 20 / 30-
3 or 5 credits

Prerequisite: Physical Education 10
This course is designed for students who want to remain athletically active and who are interested developing individual leadership skills. Students will be introduced to a wide range of activities to encourage life-long fitness. Such activities include: aquatics, badminton, basketball, biking / in-line skating, bowling, curling, fitness, dance, flag football, golf, lacrosse, touch rugby, stuntnastics, tennis, ultimate frisbee, and volleyball.

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Social Studies

Social Studies courses are designed to assist students in acquiring the basic knowledge, skills and attitudes needed to be responsible citizens and contributing members of society. Students learn to use problem-solving, decision-making and critical and creative-thinking strategies to address issues and problems. The content of the courses draws upon history, geography, economics, other social sciences, and the humanities. The content serves as the context in which important skills and attitudes are developed.

Social Studies 10-
5 Credits

This is a Canadian studies course in which students will acquire an understanding of forces and events that have influenced the development of Canada and are shaping the lives of Canadians today. The course will focus on the achievement and maintenance of Canada’s sovereignty, the effects of regionalism and the development of a national identity. Responsible citizenship will also be an area of focus ion which students will be expected to have an understanding of the structure and function of government, as well as a willingness to exercise the rights and duties of citizenship in a changing Canadian society.

Social Studies 13-
5 Credits

This is a course for students who have had considerable difficulty in Social Studies in junior high or Social Studies 10 students who wish to take Social Studies 23 instead of continuing on to Social Studies 20. Course content is similar to Social Studies 10 but takes a more general format.

Social Studies 20- 
5 Credits

Prerequisite: Social Studies 10
Social Studies 20 is a study of the growth of global perspectives in world affairs. It includes an examination of European history from 1750 to 1918 as students will examine nationalism, industrialization, imperialism, and international conflict. Students will also examine, on a global scale, diversity, development, quality of life, and alternative futures while including an understanding of different perspectives on all global issues.

Social Studies 23-
5 Credits

Prerequisite: Social Studies 10 or 13
This course parallels Social Studies 20-1, but is designed for students who have experienced difficulty with Social Studies 10 or who have taken Social Studies 13.

Social Studies 30-
5 Credits

Prerequisite: Social Studies 20
Social Studies 30 focuses on understanding our contemporary world. Topic A deals with political and economic systems in theory and practice. Students should focus on individual and group roles in various political and economic systems and the appropriate balance between the collective good and individual interests. Topic B deals with global interactions among nations. Students will focus on the motives, consequences, and alternative choices in 20th Century global interactions since World War I (e.g. World War II, United Nations, Cold War). Completion of this course requires the successful writing of the provincial diploma exam.

Social Studies 33-
5 Credits

Prerequisite: Social Studies 20 or 23
This course parallels Social Studies 30, but is designed for students who have experienced difficulty with Social Studies 20 or who have taken Social Studies 23. Completion of this course requires the successful writing of the provincial diploma exam.

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Science

Upon entering high school, students have the choice of taking two different courses: Science 10 or 14. Most students register in Science 10 because it is the prerequisite for Biology 20, Chemistry 20, Physics 20, and Science 20. Following the completion of Science 10, students may branch off and take one or more courses that interest them (Biology, physics and/or chemistry). Which 20-level course(s) to register in is a decision that must take into account both your interests and the entrance requirements of post-secondary institutions. Science 14 is a less detailed course that is the prerequisite for Science 24. It is recommended that students who have a Science 9 mark of less than 60% take Science 14

SCIENCE 10-
5 credits

This is a general science course that covers all three main areas of science, biology, chemistry and physics. Many concepts are covered, including cells, transport in organisms, elements, compounds, chemical change, force, motion and energy transformation.

SCIENCE 14-
5 credits

This course covers four main themes: properties of matter, energy transfer technologies, matter and energy in living systems and matter and energy in the environment.

SCIENCE 20-
5 credits

Prerequisite: Science 10
This course is designed to cover topics related to transfer of energy and matter. Students investigate plate tectonics, chemical changes and Newton’s Laws. This course will also be available to students through our STAR OUTREACH.

SCIENCE 24-
5 credits

Prerequisite: Science 10, Science 14, see chart.
Four main themes are covered in this general science course. The themes are application of matter and chemical change, understanding common energy conversion systems, disease defense and human health and motion, change and transportation safety.

SCIENCE 30
5 credits

Prerequisite: Science 20, Biology 20, Physics 20, Chemistry 20
This course is designed to cover the fundamental concepts and skills common to biology, chemistry and physics. Students investigate how living systems respond to their environment, chemistry in the environment, electromagnetic energy and energy and the environment. Completion of this course requires the successful writing of the provincial diploma exam. This course is also available through our STAR OUTREACH.

BIOLOGY 20-
5 credits

Prerequisite: Science 10 (65% recommended)
Areas of biology that are covered include the biosphere, adaptations, cellular respiration and photosynthesis, matter and energy in ecosystems, nutrition, digestive system, circulatory system, respiratory system and excretory system.

BIOLOGY 30-
5 credits

Prerequisite: Biology 20
There are four major areas of study in Biology 30. These include the nervous/endocrine (hormone) systems, reproduction and fetal development, genetics (chromosomes and DNA) and population biology. Completion of this course requires the successful writing of the provincial diploma exam.

CHEMISTRY 20-
5 credits

Prerequisite: Science 10 (65% recommended)
Matter and chemical change are the themes common to all units in this course. The course consists of four units of study: matter as solutions (acids, bases and gases), quantitative relationships in chemical change, chemical bonding in matter and the diversity of matter (an introduction to organic chemistry).

CHEMISTRY 30-
5 credits

Prerequisite: Chemistry 20
The themes of change, energy, matter and systems are studied in terms of thermochemical changes (heat energy of chemical reactions), electrochemical changes (electrical energy changes) and acid-base chemistry. Completion of this course requires the successful writing of the provincial diploma exam.

PHYSICS 20
5 credits

Prerequisite: Science 10 (60% recommended)
The science theme common to all units in this course is energy. Energy in its many forms causes change and determines the kind of changes matter undergoes. The course consists of 4 units of study: kinematics and dynamics, circular motion and gravitation, mechanical waves and light.

PHYSICS 30-
5 credits

Prerequisite: Physics 20
The diversity of matter and energy are the predominant themes of this course. The 4 units of study include: conservation of energy and momentum, electric forces and fields, magnetic forces and fields, the nature of matter and radioactivity. Completion of this course requires the successful writing of the provincial diploma exam.

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Outdoor Education

This progam is designed to assist the students on their journey as a responsible outdoor user. Each student will demonstrate knowledge of wildlife and ecosystems and examine the need to manage and conserve wildlife. Students will learn about the forest regions of Canada and be able to identify common trees and shrubs native to Alberta. Students will learn first-aid skills (including CPR) and demonstrate techniques and procedures for dealing with emergency situations. Finally, they will develop a competency in survival and trip planning and will participate in a 3 day camping trip to practice skills learned in class. They will demonstrate the basic skills required for responsible participation in a range of outdoor activities. Students who successfully complete all modules will receive 4 credits.

Possible modules include:

Wildlife 1010 – What is Wildlife?

Wildlife 1020 – Natural History of Wildlife

Wildlife 1030 – Outdoor Experiences I

Forestry 1020 – Forest Regions of Canada

CMH 2120 – First Aid/CPR

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Business Education

In our rapidly changing, complex world, the ability to manage our financial affairs is a basic requirement. Financial management is required in all aspects of society and is an essential life skill.

The first semester Business Class focuses on the bookkeeping and accounting. This course will provide an opportunity for students to learn about the development and use of financial information and to apply this information within the context of business and personal life. The field of financial management offers many occupational opportunities.

Students in Financial Management will:

  • develop an appreciation for ethics in personal and business financial management and investment
  • develop an awareness of the impact of the economy on self, society and the workplace
  • develop basic knowledge, skills and attitudes that have specific applications to financial management and broad career applications to the world of work
  • develop decision-making, problem-solving and communicative skills that demonstrate initiative, creativity and flexibility within a rapidly changing financial environment
  • demonstrate the ability to work cooperatively with others
  • use community and business partnerships to relate and apply theory to realistic situations

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Foods

CTS is a “hands on” practical course that will expand a student’s culinary talents, stretch their knowledge and delight their taste buds. Students will attempt to master the basics and then prepare gourmet delights. CTS Foods modules provide an opportunity for students to explore food technology, multicultural diversity, healthy attitudes and trends in eating through the written and practical approach.

Food Modules:

Introductory Level:

FOD 1010: Food Basics

FOD 1020: Baking Basics

FOD 2060: Milk Products & Eggs

FOD 2080: Vegetables / Fruits / Grains

Intermediate Level:

FOD 2030: Food Decisions & Health

FOD 2040: Cake & Pastry

FOD 2170: International Cuisine 1

Advance Level:

FOD 3030: Creative Baking

FOD 3040: Advanced Yeast Products

FOD 3100: Entertaining with Food

* Additional Modules may be added or substituted when necessary.

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Info Processing

Grade 10

Grade 10 Information Processing is designed to prepare students for success in integrating a wide range of computer skills in school, work, and life. The course is threefold in nature. First, students will display proficiency in standard keyboard and keypad techniques. Second, students will begin to develop high-school competencies in word-processing, graphic design, and spreadsheet. For students who participate in the second semester, they will continue their progress by developing competency in multimedia and programming. Third, students will become aware of job and career opportunities through a variety of articles and assignments that demonstrate the many uses of computer skills in today’s evolving workplace.

Grade 11

Grade 11 Info. Processing is a three (3) credit course that begins with two required modules, but then offers the student the opportunity to personalize their course by enabling them to choose their final module. The course is fourfold in nature, with an increased opportunity for students to display independent initiative in a wide range of modules. First, students will demonstrate understanding of current (standard) computer architecture and network design. Secondly, students will display excellency in standard keyboard and keypad techniques. Thirdly, students will have their first opportunity to design the remainder of their course (one module) by individual planning it with the teacher. Fourthly, students will increasingly become aware of job and career opportunities through a variety of articles and assignments that demonstrate the many uses of computers and computer skills in today’s evolving workplace.

PREREQUISITES

The Grade 10 modules of Keyboarding 1, Word Processing 1, Graphics Tools, and Spreadsheets 1 are important prerequisites for Grade 11 Information Processing.

GR. 10 INFORMATION PROCESSING MODULES

INF1020 Keyboarding 1

INF1030 Word Processing 1

INF1040 Graphics Tools

INF1060 Spreadsheet 1

INF1070 Hypermedia Tools

INF1080 Programming 1

GR. 11 INFORMATION PROCESSING MODULES

INF2010 Workstation Operations–Required

INF2030 Keyboarding 2 (30 WPM)–Required

INF2040 Keyboarding 3 (40 WPM)–Optional

INF2050 Word Processing 2–Optional

INF2060 Electronic Publishing–Optional

INF2130 Multimedia 1–Optional

INF2200 Information Highway 2–Optional

INF2150 Programming 2–Optional

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